Yorkshire moors

Visiting Yorkshire has always been high on my bucket list for many reasons ranging from, longing to see the beautiful seaside town of Whitby and eat ‘proper’ fish and chips, to visiting the moors and dales which I pictured so vividly whilst reading Wuthering Heights.

I’ve been looking into where to go and what to do in Yorkshire more closely as I’m hoping to get up there very soon. In fact, my research tells me that now would be the perfect time to take in the glory that is Farndale! Imagine walking in a sea of daffodils that stretch as far as the eye can see. Apparently, the golden blooms were planted by the monks of Rievaulx Abbey, (another place to visit on my bucket list) the golden banks of the River Dove shine along the three and a half mile walk from Low Mill to Church Houses and back.

Bronte Country is said to be wild and dramatic, I’d love to climb the rugged moorlands and capture them on camera and pop into the Bronte Parsonage Museum where the family lived in Haworth.

I want to visit Saltaire, a UNESCO World Heritage site. This beautiful Victorian model village with its cobbled streets and terraced cottages was built for the workers of the Salt Mills. It’s also close to David Hockney’s place of birth and as one of his longtime admirers, I’d like to see his work displayed in the Salt Mills. Whilst we’re on the subject of art, there is the Yorkshire Sculpture Park near Wakefield that looks really intriguing, I do love a good sculpture park!

Whitby

Whitby

I couldn’t possibly go all the way to Yorkshire and not see Whitby. I’ve heard so much about it and every time a photo come up on my Instagram feed of the town I find myself wishing to go and see it for myself.

Noted as one of the greatest sights in Britain, the Whitby Abbey is said to powerfully domineer the fishing harbour. There are 199 stone steps to climb to get the best view and luckily there are a few renowned pubs and eateries close by for refreshment. Fortune’s Kippers dates back to 1872!

The Yorkshire coastline is dotted with sandy bays, coves and centuries of maritime history to explore.

Scarborough is one that I’d like to explore in more detail. This original Victorian spa centre has a castle, an open-air theatre and is a well-known shopping centre too.

Yorkshire Dales

Yorkshire Dales

I’d like to think that my meanderings through the county would take me across the Dales. I’d love to walk Baxter and find some of the beautiful waterfalls that the area boasts. I didn’t know that each dale has its own name and its own character. I hadn’t realised that one of my favourite cheeses – Wensleydale is actually a dale in Yorkshire (I know!) In fact, Wensleydale is home to three most spectacular falls; Aysgarth Falls where the River Are washes down the broad limestone steps, the Hardraw Force – England’s highest single drop waterfall and the West Burton Falls.

The Forbidden Corner

The name alone makes me want to go there! If like me, you like the odd and quirky then this could be the attraction for you. Tucked away near Leyburn is a park of pathways to nowhere that lead into the most obscurer mazes where you bump into curious carved statues and even a pyramid! Apparently it is entrance on a first come first served basis so might be worth a telephone call beforehand. Also close by is the Jervaulx Abbey ruins said to be a great visit too.

Where to stay in Yorkshire

To make the most of my Yorkshire visit I’d like to stay in a cottage, a place to call my own during my stay where I can put the kettle on and sit back on a comfy sofa after a day out sightseeing. Plus, of course, there would be some spectacular views to take in. Ingrid Flute’s Yorkshire Holiday Cottages https://www.yorkshireholidaycottages.co.uk/ offer exactly what I am looking for and there are plenty of options to choose from to suit all budgets and tastes.

visiting Yorkshire

If you know Yorkshire better than me, please let me know of some places to add to my list.

keswick

Image credit: Stuart Hodgson from www.hikingphotographer.uk

The Lake District is in the north-west of England in the county of Cumbria and I have yet to go and visit, shocking I know. In fact, I am making it one of my 2018 goals to spend some time there next year as I have heard so many good things. If people have been returning here for centuries, there must be a very good reason, right?

The whole area is a National Park that is teeming with lakes, woodlands, wildlife and pretty towns and villages to explore. Of course, it’s a hikers paradise and many people come here quite simply to get out in the open and walk the fabulous landscape taking in some of the greatest views in the world. Many different outdoor lovers are drawn to the Lake District; cyclists, kayakers (is that a word?), canoeists even treetop trekkers – yes there is such a thing.

But, not all of us want to spend all of our time being active, luckily the Lake District has a host of other things to do that will keep you more than amused during your stay.

Things to do in the Lake District

Firstly, we can divide the things to do in the Lake District into areas, the north, the east, central, south-east and western areas. Each part has many things to do and I have cherry-picked a few that I would love to see with my family.

MILL RACE COTTAGE

Mill Race Cottage

Castlerigg Stone Circle – Northern Lake District

I am fascinated with stone circles. From our first visit to Stonehenge, the curiosity of these ancient monuments keeps drawing me in. The 38 large stones that stand 3 metres high of Castlerigg Stone Circle have the most dramatic mountain landscape as a backdrop. As one of Britain’s earliest stone circles, about 5000 years old, they are very popular with tourists and are now managed by the National Trust and the English heritage. If you are visiting the are in midwinter you’ll probably get one of the best views as the entrance seems to line up with the sunsets around that time of year.

Haweswater Dam – Eastern Lake District

Haweswater Dam was Britain’s first concrete buttress dam built back in the 1930’s by hundreds of unemployed workers from the Manchester area. The workers were homed in prefabricated houses that had state of the art community facilities in Burnbanks. The dam is the highest in our country and offers spectacular views of the surrounding area.

Shap Abbey – Eastern Lake District

Shap Abbey was built around 1200 and was the centre of a thriving monastic community. As you wander the ruins you can make out the church, chapter house and living areas that surround the square cloister. There are also traces of the guest rooms, stables and workshops. Henry VIII closed the Abbey in 1540 and some of its stone was used to build Shap Market Hall.

Copt Howe Rock Carvings – Central Lake District

Another fascinating find from 6000 years ago is the circles, lines and ‘cup’ marks found etched into the rocks at Copt Howe. Archaeologists believe they may have been a way of showing links between people and important places.

Meadow Bank

Meadow Bank

Brantwood Barkpeeler’s Hut – South Eastern Lake District

Once upon a time, you could have worked as a bark peeler. Your job would have been to remove the bark from oak trees before the trees were coppiced and sent to the local tanneries. Barkpeelers lived in huts in the woods with their families, the huts were made of a circular stone wall and a conical roof covered with earth and grass. There is a wonderful reconstructed example at Brantwood House.

Townend Statesman’s House – South Eastern Lake District

On the other end of the scale is the home of a well -off farming family. Townend Statesman’s House is a beautifully preserved 17th century farmhouse built in 1623 for George Browne and his family who lived there for over 300 years.

Muncaster Castle – Western Lake District

I do love to visit a castle and Muncaster has been in the Pennington family since 1208. What started out as a medieval fortified tower-house was added to through the years until the fine castle that can be visited today. An interesting fact that caught my eye was, Henry VI sought refuge here during the Wars of the Roses and left a glass drinking-bowl behind, saying if it remained unbroken the Penningtons would thrive. It’s still intact and is known as the ‘Luck of Muncaster’.

Ravenglass Roman Bathhouse – Western Lake District

Ravenglass is one of the best preserved Roman military bathhouses in Britain where a 1000 strong garrison would come to scrub up. Its walls are almost 4 metres high and two rooms with doorways and windows can still be seen today. As you explore you can find plumbing for hot and cold water a fort close by and many more interesting facts.

Brathay Loft

Brathay Loft

Where to stay in the Lake District

If you want to have the comfort of your own home whilst you explore the Lake District then I advise you to take a look at the Good Life Lake District Cottages as they cover all of the above-mentioned areas and have all types of accommodation available, even pet friendly homes where you can take your family pet along too. The images above are some examples of what you can find.

Following on from my recent post of Things to do in Suffolk, after our recent visit to the Airstream Glamping park. I thought I’d turn my attention to places closer to home. The autumn and winter are the perfect time to get out and about locally. We have Pocahontas on our doorstep, along with Shorne Country Park which is a huge family favourite, Jeskyns Park and of course, our beloved Thanet where we have our caravan.

Even with all of these opportunities, I still have an enormous bucket list of where I’d like to take the girls on day trips close to home.

Things to do in Kent

Leeds Castle

Leeds castle

We have been to visit Leeds Castle on a number of occasions and we shall certainly be returning soon as there is always something exciting to see. This is also where we find our local Go Ape centre which the twins adore and want to return to soon.

Dover

Dover is high on my list as I took Thomas and Megan there when they were children and we visited Dover Castle, the Tunnels in the cliffs with a fascinating wartime history and of course, the notorious White Cliffs of Dover. I suggest taking a picnic along and making a day of it.

Canterbury

I adore Canterbury and now my niece has moved there to study at the university I shall hopefully be going down more often. Canterbury city is a marvellous place to wander, it has a powerful history to take in, hundreds of shops, pubs and restaurants to choose from, a cathedral to visit and plenty more to keep you amused and the children too. One of my favourite bars is the old Pound which sits outside the town wall. You can sit and drink in one of the cells!

Margate

shell grotto margate

How can I not mention Margate? If you are still thinking of a run-down, dilapidated seaside town you are very wrong and I strongly suggest you visit to see just how far Margate has come over the past few years. With the rebirth of Dreamland and the addition of the Turner Contemporary, Margate has become the place to be both in summer and winter. Walk the streets of the Old Town, visit the Shell Grotto, eat some delicious fish and chips and visit one of the many trendy bars and pubs that are popping up all over the place.

Hever Castle

The perfect example of an item on my bucket list! I remember visiting Hever Castle with the school when I was in junior school and it is a place I would love to take the twins. A romantic 13th century moated castle that was Anne Boleyn’s childhood home, it has magnificent interiors to walk through and wonder about the time Anne herself lived there plus, award-winning gardens. Of course, the Maze is a definite visit!

If you are looking for somewhere special to stay, take a look at Kent and Sussex Cottages as they have a wonderful selection of all budgets and preferences.

Things to do in Sussex

Royal Pavillion

My great grandma used to live in Hove, just along from Brighton and we would visit her in the summer. One summer we visited the Royal Pavilion and I was smitten with the beautiful rooms and decor of the palace. I want to take the twins there so they too can experience this historical landmark.

South Downs and the Seven Sisters

Friends of mine recently posted some fabulous pictures on social media after a day trip to the Seven Sisters. I think it would be a perfect day trip with a picnic in tow. Hopefully, the sun would shine and I could grab some great photos!

Rye Harbour and nature reserve

Rye beach hut

We visited Rye a long time ago when the twins were still sharing a cot! We had a wonderful few days there and visited the town plus the local beach where I took the photo of this gorgeous beach hut. I would love to return and thoroughly recommend it to friends and family.

There are plenty of places to stay in all of the above areas but if you are looking for a cottage, that offers that little bit more, then take a look at Suffolk Secrets.

This is a collaborative post – all opinions are my own.

This summer the twins spent a fortnight with the grandparents whilst Paul and I worked (this has been the most difficult part of going full-time for me, not being able to spend the school holidays with my girls). At the end of the fortnight, Paul and I travelled up to the Midlands on Friday after work and we all spent the weekend together.

We have visited a number of places on previous visits, Sherwood Forest, White Post Farm and Newark, all of which are beautiful but this time the grandparents took us to Creswell Crags.

Creswell Crags

What is Creswell Crags?

It’s such a strange name that doesn’t give anything away, does it? But if you venture out to this beauty spot you’ll be surprised at what a great place it is for the family and especially for the kids.

map of creswell crags

The first thing that struck me was the fact that this place has been a stop off for travellers for thousands of years, we’re talking between 50,000 and 10,000 years ago.

The limestone gorge has plenty of caves along the sides and in some of them, stone tools and animal remains have been found along with the most amazing Ice Age rock art proof of the dwellers that passed by many years ago.

Creswell Crags cave home

We are lucky to have a number of caves used in prehistoric times in Britain and walking around them brings a quick history lesson to life – not just for the children! It’s impossible to not think about how it would have been and looked all that time ago. How cold would the caves have been to sleep in? How would they have kept themselves warm and safe with no door to close?

Situated on the Derbyshire/Nottinghamshire border Creswell Craggs has a large car park where you can leave the car all day for just £3. It is free to visit the site and walk around the lake and gorge and you can also stop off in the cafeteria and gift shop before making your way home.

There are two tours that you can book to attend The Ice Age Tour and the Rock Art Tour. We hadn’t booked anything and arrived at the wrong time to join a tour so it’s worth checking their website before you go for times and prices.

creswell crags flint knife blade

The Ice Age tour takes place in Robin Hood Cave, the largest cave on the site and you find out who lived there, why they were there and how the information was discovered.

The Rock Art tour shows the only Ice Age Rock Art known in Britain. It was discovered in 2003 and consists of engravings of animals, birds and motifs. The engravings are estimated to be 13,000 years old making Church Hole Cave the oldest in Britain.

Cresswell Crags pony ride

We chose to walk around Creswell Crags under our own steam. The walk is a leisurely one with the girls scrambling up every rock face they can to peek into the caves – which incidentally are closed and only opened by the tour guide. The photo above is down at the bottom of the gorge working our way back up to the centre. We also collected a bagful of wild blackberries on our way round and added them to our roulade pudding that nonna prepared that evening.

Cresswell Crags

There are lots of informative signs as you go round which the twins loved reading. I don’t think they could quite understand the extent of how old it all was but they found it fascinating and I know it’s the kind of information that stuck.

reswell crags

Down at the bottom of the gorge, we got caught in some light rain and the pair of them danced around having a good laugh and enjoying being outside in the fresh air.

creswell crags

Sometimes it’s when you least expect it that you get a really good photo. I love this one of Alice in the tree whilst we were waiting for the rain to stop.

Once we had completed the gorge, we worked our way back to the centre where there is a large green area with games for the children to play on – slides down the mammoth’s tusks and climbing frames. There are also some picnic tables, where we stopped for lunch and as you get to the top there is the gift shop full of fossils, semi-precious stones and plenty of other merchandise to tempt you.

If you don’t have a picnic, the coffee shop has snacks and drinks and there is also an exhibition that you can pay to enter too.

A great family day out enjoyed by all.

 

beach hut southwold

We recently had a weekend away to Suffolk and stayed the night in an Airstream glamping campsite which was a fantastic experience. We managed to get out and about and it quickly became apparent that there is a lot to see and do in Suffolk, so much so that we plan on returning as soon as we can. Whilst we were there, we picked up some great leaflets giving ideas of things to do in Suffolk so I thought I’d write them all down in preparation for our next trip.

Things to do in Suffolk

Aldeburgh

Aldeburgh shell on beach

We stopped off at Aldeburgh and walked along the beach as a swimming race was taking place. There is a fabulous sculpture of a scallop shell on the beach made by Maggi Hamblings with the words, ‘I hear those voices that will not be drowned.’

Apparently, there are two fish and chip shops in Aldeburgh both owned by the same company but everyone seems to think that one is better than the other. You can tell which because of the queue waiting outside the shop. We have to return as we didn’t manage to try the famous fish and chips.

Helmingham Hall

Helmingham Hall is a beautiful manor house surrounded by a moat dating back to 1490. It is still owned by the same family, the Tollemache’s and Lady Xa Tollemache is a renowned gardener having won many medals at the Chelsea Flower Show, in fact, people come here to visit the gardens as much as they do the historical building.

Framlingham Castle

Famous for being the base from which Mary Tudor rallied her troops and set off to claim the throne in London. Framlingham Castle is part of the English Heritage and offers a great family day out. Walk the walls, visit the workshop, the cafe and of course the shop plus picking up a lot of history on your way. It is said that a walk around the walls of the castle offers some of the best views to be had in Suffolk.

Thorpness

house in the clouds

We visited and walked around the quiet seaside village. We walked as far as The House in the Clouds, a famous building for its tall structure and seemingly house in the sky. Opposite was an old windmill that featured in the CBeebies programme, Grandpa in my pocket. We walked around the pretty boating lake but it was too cold a day for us to take a boat out so we popped into the restaurant The Kitchen and enjoyed some freshly made pizzas and a crab salad.

Southwold

under southwold pier

I was quite excited about going to Southwold as I had heard lots about it. We parked up at the pier and walked Baxter along to the end. It’s amazing as there are so many curiosities and shops to visit. The Quantum telescope, The Waterclock and the Wacky Walk of Mirrors being a few. The Under The Pier show is a must, an arcade about half way along which has some completely mad machines.

southwold pier

Lavenham

Known as England’s best kept medieval village, Lavenham is chocolate-box pretty with half-timbered merchant’s houses, winding streets, a 15th century church and a long list of listed buildings including the 800 year old Swan Hotel. Lavenham’s more recent claim to fame is being the village where Harry Potter was born. Lavenham was used as Godric’s Hollow in the filming of The Deathly Hallows Part 1 and Part 2.

Visit a brewery

Of course! Suffolk is the home to Greene King, Adnams and Aspall plus a range of smaller breweries too. the most picturesque possibly being St Peter’s Brewery in South Elmham. I have to go back just to buy some Adnams gin.

The list of things to do in Suffolk is infinite and one place to look for more inspiration is on the Visit Suffolk website where they give a list of 50 things to do in Suffolk!

Where to stay in Suffolk

There is a wonderful range of places to stay in the county, take a look at Suffolk Secrets who have all kinds of accommodation from contemporary through to rustic cottages and many of the properties are pet-friendly too. Whether it’s a couples retreat or a big family reunion there is something for everyone.

This is a collaborative post.

Things to do in suffolk pin