Guru Nanak Darbar Gravesend

I was born into the Catholic religion and my Nana was so staunch a Catholic that she practically lived in St Patrick’s church at the end of her south London street. On seeing us every other weekend her first question would be, ‘Have you been to mass?’ We replied yes because this made her happy and we would go on to make fairy cakes but the truth was, Mum was Church of England and she didn’t practice so nobody made us go when we weren’t with Nana.

I remember after Nana died in 1989 I asked Dad, ‘Do you think nana’s in Heaven Dad?’ His reply that made me smile was, ‘Blimey, if she didn’t make it love, we don’t stand a chance!’

All three of us went to the local RC comprehensive school; the education is second to none but R.E classes always started with ‘…and stand up if you weren’t in church this weekend’. Invariably I had to stand up and I would be questioned, my reply being ‘I was in London at my nana’s, we went to St Patrick’s.’

The older I got the less it bothered me and by the time I was in the 6th form I had lost any love I may have had for the Catholic church and set out to search for something more meaningful to me.

I am constantly on the lookout for information and interested in how others practice their faith. Because even if I am not a church goer, I do believe. I believe there is a bigger plan, I believe in karma. I believe in Love thy Neighbour and treat as you wish to be treated. I have come to my own constantly evolving conclusion that maybe there’s a little truth in all religions.

guru nanak darbar gravesend

I live in a suburb of London and I grew up here. It’s a busy town, home to many London commuters and people from all walks of life. Nowhere was this more obvious than at our comprehensive school where the mixed classes brought together many children from the popular surrounding communities.

Our local Sikh community has grown extensively and if you ever come to Gravesend you can bet your last penny that the curry will be one of the best in the land, we have award-winning chefs, contemporary Indian restaurants and more take aways than you can shake a stick at but, it was when the Sikh community started to build the Guru Nanak Darbar Gurdwara that people started to have an opinion and many didn’t like the idea.

Guru Nanak Darbar Gravesend

If you ever have the chance to visit you will be taken with the beauty of this temple, years of planning and community spirit to make this one of the most beautiful temples in Britain. The project was entirely funded by the local community. they set up their own construction company to make best use of the skills available to them and for the more detailed stonework and woodcarving, specialist companies in India were contracted.

I went to have a closer look for myself and fortunately the sun came out for me. I found great beauty, I found a place of worship that brings families together. Whilst I walked around the outside, I saw men enter, groups of old women chatting and I saw parents with their children.

I think it’s pretty amazing what people can do when they put their minds to it.

Guru Nanak Darbar Gravesend

I read the inscriptions that had been translated for the English speaking and reading visitors and on returning home I visited the website dedicated to the Gurdwara and found this

Name – From Punjabi sikh, “learner” or “disciple”
founded – c. 1500 in India by Sri Guru Nanak Dev Ji (1469-1539)
adherents – 23 million
main location – Punjab region of India
original language – Punjabi
purpose of lifeOvercome the self, align life with will of God, and become a “saint soldier,” fighting for good
afterlifeReincarnation until resolve karma and merge with God.
major holidays – Vaisakhi Day, Birthday of Guru Nanak, Birthday of Guru Gobind Singh
five cardinal vices1. lust 2. anger 3. greed 4. worldly attachment 5. pride
Does anything sound familiar to you? It does to me and I’d like to think that we’re all working for the same goal at the end of the day, that of making this world a better place for our children to live in.
Peace be with you.

Quaint is pretty much a great word for summing up the countryside surrounding our area. Although we would be classed as suburban and close to London with immediate access to the A2, the main route into the capital, just a 5 minute drive in the opposite direction takes us to the countryside and we find villages like Cobham, Kent where the houses are ‘Once Upon A Time-ish’ and the pubs are… well, quaint.

In fact what better than on a bright Spring sunny afternoon to mosey on down to a local pub and drink a cool beer in the pretty garden? Luckily for us, these local pubs all have outstanding food too which means phoning well before hand to make sure you get a table!

A closer look at Cobham reveals that it is a hamlet of Sole Street, the parish church is dedicated to St Mary Magdalene – my favourite saint ever and the most important woman in JC’s life, the church is also home to brasses reputed to be the finest in England. Charles Dickens, one of Britain’s finest writers used to walk out to the village and set part of The Pickwick Papers there. Another claim to fame is the artist Richard Dadd, the insane artist, used to live here and murdered his father in these parts in 1843.

One last thing that must be mentioned about Cobham is it’s hall, Cobham Hall  A manor house has stood on these grounds since the 12th century but  it has been home to a public girls’ school since 1957. Once the 17th century home of the Earls of Darnley and in fact the 8th Earl of Darnley was the first cricket captain to attempt to recover the Ashes from Australia.

If you are ever on route to dover via the A2, this beautiful quaint, quintessential English village is well worth a stop off, just make sure you book a table atone of the pubs beforehand

I wish I had this shot for yesterday’s Gallery post!

Quirky is one of those descriptive words that explain a whole way of being in 6 letters and for me it’s a perfect word for describing your average British woman.

quirk (kwûrk)

n. 1. A peculiarity of behavior; an idiosyncrasy: “Every man had his own quirks and twists” (Harriet Beecher Stowe).

2. An unpredictable or unaccountable act or event; a vagary: a quirk of fate.3. A sudden sharp turn or twist.4. An equivocation; a quibble.5. Architecture A lengthwise groove on a molding between the convex upper part and the soffit.

The ability to take something out of context and add a little soupson of imagination and create a brand new identity. If there is one thing I adore about being British it’s our love of creativity, our passion of trying something new and more than that – not being afraid to give it a go.
I did a quick Google search which brought up some very interesting and quirky links, for example Quirky Travel, a blog only started up at the beginning of the year but already caught my eye. Then there’s the Quirky Traveller’s Tales offering a different insight to places you may have already been to but worth reading.
Do you have a quirky friend who you never know what to buy for when it’s birthday time? Here’s Quirky Gift
or Quirky Cakes

Group photo in Tate Modern, London

I only have to think the word Italiani and I have a smile on my face. I can say, hand on heart, they are the friendliest, noisiest, chattiest and most patriotic people I know. You cannot BUT be pulled to them and their view on life. They are convinced theirs is the best diet in the world and turn their nose up at our poor English cuisine, you will not, I repeat, will not win a discussion with them over food, trust me just leave it, even if your dad is Gordon Ramsey. They know their country is one of the most beautiful in the world, after all it offers everything, sun, sand, mountains, skiing, countryside, good food EVERYWHERE and they produce most of it themselves. And I would urge anyone thinking of a visit to go, having worked for a few years at the Italian Tourist Board and lived in Italy myself for close to 20 years  it’s like a second home to me.

I was lucky enough this week to have my very own ‘italiani’ over in London for a few days. My best friend Enrica with an entourage that puts Madonna to shame, her husband and their beautiful daughter Vittoria (asleep in her buggy) Max’s two children from his previous marriage and Enrica’s sister who has a very impressive camera and I dread to think how many photos she took home of London with her. Sadly for us, the weather wasn’t palying ball, as we stepped out onto the South Bank to make our way to the Tate Modern the heavens opened and as we raced for the final tunnel that would lead us to the Art Galleries’ entrance we found it was blocked off for repair! Aaaarrrrggghhh! We lugged the two heavy buggies up steps and raced them round to the old power station that houses this marvellous Exhibition house and that is why dear reader we look like drenched rats in our photo :)

We were lucky to catch up with Serena too who is over for six months to improve her English and work/live the London life for a while. And as we stood here for our photo, in the Turbine Hall below us a carpet of sunflower seeds laid out wall to wall. It’s only on closer inspection you see the artist Ai Weiwei has hand crafted each seed from porcelain. 100 million seeds forming a seemingly endless landscape. Go here to see a video fo the man himself and the beauty of his sculpture.

This is my entry for I in Alphabe Thursday over at Jenny Matlock’s and now I’m heading over to see what everyone else came up with.

Photo credit – Tate Modern

F is allowing me the perfect opportunity to show you a stunning part of the UK which I visited recently for the first time. Devon, a county in the south-west that bulges at the seams with beauty, quaintness and quintessential Englishness.

We were staying in Torquay on the English Riviera and although it was late summer, September, we did benefit from some gorgeous sunny days along with the odd rainfall and grey skies that us Brits are so used to. When visiting a new area I love to do a bit of research before I leave on internet, asking friends who have already been there and picking up thousands of leaflets from reception on arrival to read whilst dinner is cooking the first night.

The first holiday snap I share with you is one of a fishing boat in Torquay harbour, I really like this photo even though Paul was standing in the background asking ‘Why are you taking a photo of that?’

An overall recommendation was Dartmouth, a beautiful, picturesque village at the mouth of the River Dart and apart from the boutique shops, fabulous eateries like Cafe Alf Fresco for example I was fascinated and taken back in time when I saw the car ferry being pushed and shoved by a tug boat back and forth over the River continuously. I just had to share this bizarre ferry with you.

The ferry is being pushed by the tug boat

arrives on the other side

One coming, one going

…and yes I did convince Paul to take us back via that tug pushed ferry just to try it out! Amazing the skill Captain Tug had, he made it look effortless.

Finally’ fuel’ to finish off with the F’s this week. Tea is my fuel, a good ol’ English cuppa with milk and no sugar and as we cannot survive without fuel especially after a day of sightseeing, walking around the town center and visiting the amazing art galleries, we jumped in the car and headed back home. As always is the case the girls were really grumbling and we still had a good half an hour to go, so we stopped off at Paignton beach and headed for the Cafe on the seafront for quick refreshments, isn’t it absolutely gorgeous? A typical British seaside cafe, advertising all their wares on blackboards and brightly coloured letters on the woodwork. I love it and couldn’t refuse it. I probably paid double for my tea and the crab sandwich was extortionate but hey, nice photo for a lovely memory.

These are my ‘F’s for Alphabe Thursday over at Jenny Matlock’s blog go and have a look what everyone else comes up with for the ‘F’ Fiesta today

boats fishing nets

Well, it’s taken until Sunday this week to find time to write about our trip away as the past week has flown by.

It’s a good spot to drive to from North Kent as it took us just under 5 hours. In fact we arrived early at our Parkdean site and although check in is not until 4pm, you’ve got to try haven’t you?

So off we all traipsed to reception, the girls happy to be let loose at long last, where the lady on duty there told us quite abruptly that housekeeping wouldn’t be ready till 4pm. And that was it. No alternative, no map of the site passed over, no mention of the cafe, the soft play area, the restaurant, the swimming pool. Not a peep. So I asked for a map, tilting my head in the girls direction trying to give her a clue that we had two hours to kill with little ones in tow. You’ll get one in your welcome pack.

playing with bricks

Bessie the builder

‘Yes, thank you for that but I need one now?’ ‘Please?’

She did hand over a map but it was obvious that we were breaking from her tightly run reception rules. She was hard work and funnily enough later in the week I noticed a form to fill in on reception asking ‘Have one of our staff walked in your shoes this break?’ Please tell us who and when. Well obviously she hadn’t thought about a long journey two tired, grumpy toddlers and two parents in need of a suggestion or two. It’s not rocket science is it?

We did get settled in, housekeeping were marvellous and had all the statics done by 3pm so we were able to move in early and settle ourselves in. Our new home was lovely, a three bedroom, one bathroom with a galley kitchen and a large dining/lounging area which the girls filled immediately with toys.

torquay

Cafe Alf Resco, Dartmouth

Our first outing was into Torquay itself which if I am truthful left me a little disappointed. It may have been for the rainy weather but I don’t think so, you see the words “English Riviera” had evoked a beautiful image in my mind and that’s not what I saw. I saw a large seaside town like many others, the British high street and a harbour. I had imagined boutique shops, eateries, cafes and beauty all around.

I did find these things the very next day when we ventured on to Dartmouth. Exquisite settings and the novelty of getting a ferry both there and back. There were two ferries to choose from so we took one there and the other back. My favourite has to be the tug pulled/pushed ferry, see my photo below. Dartmouth is full of gorgeous shops, art galleries (one with Rolf Harris’ art in it) , fabulous restaurants and beautiful scenery and houses to look at.

torquay

Tug pulled/pushed ferries, Dartmouth

We also visited Pennywell Farm and had a marvellous day out there which was so lovely to see the girls enjoy. We watched the goats being milked and got up close. We collected the chickens eggs still warm and were allowed to hold them, we then fed them to the pigs along with apples from the surrounding trees, the girls were fascinated with the real noise of a pig’s snort being louder and harsher than that of Daddy Pig’s in Peppa Pig! There was a large play area with picnic tables and an enclosed space with sit on tractors which they both adored. We watched a trainer flying a falcon and we stroked an owl he held for us, I was surprised at how warm he was (the owl that is!) and interested to learn that owls are really dumb, so dumb they don’t know how to hunt but wait for something to pass under them and go in for the catch. Talk about lazy!

torquay

Egg collecting – Pennywell Farm, Devon

Pennywell Farm was a brilliant day out for us. We took a picnic but there are a few places on site where you can buy and eat food and many more activities to do than I have listed here.

So would I go back to Torquay? Probably not but I would go back to that area again and try to visit Salcombe a little further down the coast from Dartmouth.

Would I use Parkdean sites again? Yes. I would. this is our second Pardean trip the first being to West Bay also in Dorset. At this particular site I was very impressed with their indoor swimming pool which the girls adored, their clubhouse with entertainment for the little ones – we had some very wiggly bottoms on the dance floor – and the shops and restaurants on site. I did have to buy a bottle opener but now every time I travel I shall pop it in my First Aid bag and never ever be without again. Phew! Thanks Francesca for that tip :)